NCJW|LA with Justice Organizations Lead Rally to Protect Reproduction Rights

The constant call of 2017 has been rally, take action. Michelle Obama told us during her last official White House speech, “Don’t be afraid. Be focused. Be empowered.”

On the eve of the inauguration, National Council of Jewish Women Los Angeles (NCJW|LA) and reproductive health and justice organizations will do just that by leading a Rally to Save Roe. They will demonstrate the commitment to uphold the right to abortion established 44 years ago in the historic 1973 Supreme Court Case, Roe vs. Wade.

The event brings together notable speakers and inspiring performances. After the powerful rally, the community of organizations will provide advocacy training to give attendees practical tools to put beliefs into action in their community. Additionally, there will be opportunities and supplies for the public to make signs in preparation for the March for Women in LA on January 21.

Confirmed speakers:

  • State Senator Holly Mitchell
  • LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl
  • Juana Rosa Cavero, California Coalition for Reproductive Freedom
  • Councilmember Lindsey Horvath
  • Hector Villagra, ACLU of Southern California
  • Hillary Selvin, National Council of Jewish Women, Los Angeles
  • Remy Holwick
  • Marcie Smolin (MC)

Join NCJW|LA 25+ co-sponsoring organizations as they Rally to Save Roe, a rally, and training to defend women’s reproductive rights in America. The rally will begin at 5:30 PM and will be on Fairfax Ave. between Clinton St. and Rosewood Ave.

These are some of our confirmed sponsors.

  • National Council of Jewish Women, Los Angeles (host)
  • ACLU of Southern California
  • Anti-Defamation League (ADL)
  • Black Women for Wellness (BWW)
  • California Coalition for Reproductive Freedom (CCRF)
  • California Latinas for Reproductive Justice (CLRJ)
  • California NOW
  • California Women’s Law Center (CWLC)
  • City of West Hollywood
  • City of West Hollywood, Women’s Advisory Board
  • Congregation Kol Ami
  • Feminist Majority Foundation
  • Hollywood NOW
  • L.A. for Choice
  • Los Angeles City Councilmember Paul Koretz
  • Los Angeles County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl
  • NARAL Pro-Choice California
  • National Health Law Program (NHeLP)
  • Planned Parenthood Los Angeles (PPLA)
  • Planned Parenthood Young Professionals (PPYP)
  • Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC/URJ)
  • Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice (RCRC)
  • San Gabriel Valley NOW
  • Temple Israel of Hollywood
  • Temple Emanuel of Beverly Hills
  • Together We Will Los Angeles (TWWLA)
  • Women’s Reproductive Rights Assistance Project (WRRAP)

For more information check out the Facebook event at: https://www.facebook.com/events/1246453398711435/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letter to My Fierce Fighting Women Warriors

Hi, my fierce fighting women warriors. Like you, I am shocked, saddened, disbelieving, heartbroken, worried…did I say shocked?

Fortunately, I did some reading (HuffPost, Facebook, etc.) love/peace/belief/strength posts; heartfelt messages with friends…and I came to work to find realistic, tough, inspirational words from Pat Reuss, who sends the group email for NOW leaders. I will share these with you in the hope that it gives us strength for the fight ahead. Also, Russell Allan Johnson sent his sympathies and the hope that we can find responsible Republicans to work within the government. Hope springs eternal.

My feeling is that now more than ever, I am so proud to be president of our chapter, and I promise to do all I can going forward to make NOW, and women’s equality and rights, a reality in our lifetime and to secure its place after that as well! I have never been more galvanized to make a change, to make a difference, and we have momentum on our side. I want us to launch a membership drive for people of all ages to join and create change, and I want to have fundraisers for the many organizations, including NOW, that will need support.

With love and sisterhood, and the knowledge that we can do this, just as our foremothers in the suffragette movement did. ONWARD!

Michelle

I Voted Early, and This is What Happened to Me

At the Amelia Earhart Library in North Hollywood the line to vote early snaked around the park behind the library. How long would I wait wondered and almost left? Instead of leaving I joined the longest line I ever joined.

I stared at the array of people – grandmothers, bun-sporting hipsters, mothers with children in tow, women, couples patting tired pit bulls, partners delivering coffee to mates, professionals typing away on Macs, same-sex couples, and even a celebrity wondering when her number would be called — it hit me. Committed voters gathered, and the majority of them were women.

The reasons for early voting varied, but for one day that turned into night, we came together. Many of the women said they were voting now to vote for the next women president. They didn’t want to miss it. Some, particularly older voters, never imagined a day when a woman would run for president.

As we waited in line, good Samaritans handout out water and leftover over Halloween candy. At one point, a sign on a tree indicated that the wait was two hours from that point. Some folks stepped out of line when reaching this point, but overall the rate was low.

Once a voter checked in for the early voting in North Hollywood, the voter waited for her number. All waiting voters had been waiting well over three hours and yet no one seemed angry or upset in any way.

The temperature dropped, but the energy in the crowd did not wane. As the poll workers brought out packets ready for anticipating people, numbers were called – just like a lottery. People yelped and cheered as when they heard their number and finally the delay to cast a ballot.

We waited so long. People struck up conversations with those waiting directly next to them. We were friends by proximity. We talked about our jobs, our family, and all other topics just to pass the time. We understood casting our ballot was important, so the delay was of minor importance.

When my number 3648 was called I too felt I had won. With my ballot in hand, I walk to the voting booth take part in the process and if all falls into place make history.